Salvation song

May 7, 2017 Speaker: Greg Goostree Series: Exodus: freed to be God's people

Passage: Exodus 15:1–15:21

Freed to be God’s people: a study of Exodus
Salvation song–outline
Exodus 15:1-21
Sing to the Lord for he has triumphed gloriously and become our salvation

In the previous chapter, we read how the Lord defeated the Egyptians and delivered Israel through the Red Sea. Israel saw the great power of the Lord in the way he saved them. So they FEARED the Lord; they were in AWE of him. And thus, they believed in the Lord and his servant Moses. And because of their AWE-inspired faith, they sang this song.

1) Sing to the Lord, for he has gloriously triumphed and become my salvation, 15:1-3.
Would you like for God to drown your enemies in the sea? If so, what do we do with Jesus’ teaching, “love your enemies, do good to them, bless them and pray for them”? How then do we apply this song today? How might we praise God for victory over human enemies in light of Romans 5:10? What are our enemies for which we can praise God that he has delivered us from or will deliver us from? What are the ways Moses describes God? Is there a conflict between God being a God of love and a man of war? Why or why not?

2) The Lord overthrows his enemies by his glorious power and great majesty, 15:4-10.
For what does Israel praise God in 15:5-8? Why is it so important that we keep our hearts amazed at the glorious power and majesty of God? What things will we substitute for God’s majesty if we don’t maintain an awe of him? What are the “I wills” that the Egyptians boasted of in 15:9? How did God thwart their desires? What chances do God’s enemies stand against him?

3) Who is like you, Lord, who disheartens his enemies, and in your steadfast love, you lead your people to your dwelling place, 15:11-18.
What does Moses say in 15:11-12 in answering “who is like you, O Lord?” What limits does God have? What does Moses say in 15:13-17 that God does in his steadfast covenant love?

4) Sing to the Lord, for he has triumphed gloriously over his enemies and delivered his people, 15:19-21.
The song ends with a summary statement of how God saved Israel from their enemies through the sea. It repeats the first line of the song, letting us know that Miriam, Aaron’s sis (he’s mentioned because he’s oldest), and a group of women, all with tambourines, were singing and dancing to this song.
What are the major emphases of this song that we should keep central in our songs of worship? How is this song fulfilled in Jesus and what he has done for us? In what ways did Jesus’ disciples express their awe of him and what he had accomplished?

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